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SAP Social Software

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How simple is the technology you use in your business? On its own, you may say, each piece of technology is simple enough.

 

graph_330.jpgBut what if you work for a global enterprise? Even if it’s just an average-sized one, your business is likely to use more than a thousand applications. As simple as each application may be on its own, complexity becomes a factor at that scale. How do applications connected to the same process work together? How do users share data across applications? Can employees even access the right applications at the right time?

 

It’s not surprising, then, that 60% of respondents to a recent survey[1] said technology complexity has inhibited the ability of their business to meet goals. 74% said complexity in business processes and decision making did the same.

 

But complexity isn’t just an unmeasurable nuisance – it hits the bottom line, and hits it hard. One study found that complexity caused 200 of the largest companies in the world to lose over $200 billion a year in profit.

 

Complexity slows the flow of information

 

One of the most pernicious examples of complexity affecting business results is when it involves collaboration.

 

When a business has many applications, it often also has many separate silos of collaboration. Stakeholders can collaborate within each application, but if a business process involves multiple applications, the flow of information slows. Users resort to pulling documents, data, files, and screenshots out of one application and sharing them in another – or often by email. Sometimes the information is out of date, and sometimes it simply never gets shared even though it should.

 

Imagine how that can impact business results: Fewer new ideas area shared. New hires take longer to get up to speed. Customer service resolution times slow down. The time it takes to close new sales deals increases.

 

Simplify collaboration for better business results

 

But what if you could implement a single, unified platform for collaboration across your business processes and applications? That act of simplifying collaboration would have sweeping results for your business. You’d have a single, clear channel of communication to help keep everyone on the same page and committed to the right goals. Employees would be able to find experts, exchange ideas, share knowledge, and develop skills more effectively. By providing for open, rich dialog directly in the context of business data such as sales opportunities, service tickets, marketing campaigns, and business intelligence results, you’d speed business, reduce errors, and improve performance.

 

An independent study[2] confirms the results. Better, simpler collaboration does lead to better business performance. The study’s findings show that a typical organization using SAP Jam – a secure, cloud-based social software platform – can experience:

 

infographic_310.png

  • An average revenue increase of $9.63 million. Over three years, a typical organization can reduce the time to close new business by more than nine percent, leading to additional revenue opportunity of $9.63 million.
  • Recouping of employees time valued at $7 million. With SAP Jam, companies experienced a 14% decrease in time to access information and expertise, providing a more than $7 million gain.
  • Savings of more than $1.6 million in training and onboarding. Organizations reduced costs to train and onboard new employees by 13 percent, saving more than $1.6 million.
  • Savings of more than $1.1 million in serving customers. Companies resolved customer service issues more quickly with SAP Jam, leading to more than $1.1 million in savings.

 

If you’re interested in how your business could benefit from shorter sales cycle times, decreased time to access information and expertise, and lower costs associated with common business processes such as onboarding new employees, join our webcast on April 29.

 

1. Simplifying the Future of Work, Knowledge@Wharton

2. The Total Economic Impact of SAP Jam, a March 2015 commissioned study conducted by Forrester Consulting on behalf of SAP


Follow SAP Social Software on Twitter: @SAPSocial

tei_cover.pngAccording to a Forrester Consulting study commissioned by SAP, “The Total Economic Impact of SAP Jam,” a typical organization may realize a potential 516 percent return on investment by deploying SAP Jam.

 

Companies can improve sales cycle times, decrease time to access information and expertise, and lower costs associated with common business processes such as onboarding new employees by deploying SAP Jam, the study found.

 

The study polled managers, directors, and senior business and IT leaders heavily involved with their organization’s implementation of SAP Jam.

 

The findings show that a typical organization using SAP Jam can experience:

 

Free webcast: April 29

Join guests Forrester Research principal analyst Claire Schooley and senior consultant Liz Witherspoon for a social software market overview and highlights from the study.
Register now
Wednesday, April 29, 2015
1 p.m. Eastern - 60 minutes

infographic_310.png

  • An average revenue increase of $9.63 million. Over three years, a typical organization can reduce the time to close new business by more than nine percent, leading to additional revenue opportunity of $9.63 million.
  • Recouping of employees time valued at $7 million. With SAP Jam, companies experienced a 14% decrease in time to access information and expertise, providing a more than $7 million gain.
  • Savings of more than $1.6 million in training and onboarding. Organizations reduced costs to train and onboard new employees by 13 percent, saving more than $1.6 million.
  • Savings of more than $1.1 million in serving customers. Companies resolved customer service issues more quickly with SAP Jam, leading to more than $1.1 million in savings.

 

To learn more about the study, join our April 29 webcast with guest speakers Forrester Research principal analyst Claire Schooley and senior consultant Liz Witherspoon.

 

 

Follow SAP Social Software on Twitter: @SAPSocial

The Importance of SAP Jam Implementation & Adoption Expertise


The rewards of using SAP Jam are awesome! Getting to the point where business and IT value is realized takes time, logic, dedication, and expertise.  Successful SAP Jam implementations and adoption requires many considerations, some of which are often overlooked.


Piano.pngIt reminds me of the day when my family got a piano from my in-laws house for our son. While other children and friends would bang on the keys he wanted to play meaningful songs at an early age. There were adult friends and teachers who remembered playing a bit growing up (or knew a few songs) but could only offer a few ideas around how to play the piano beyond the basics.

 

Only when we got an expert piano teacher (on the second try) who had the style and skills which were complimentary to his interests did we see his enjoyment and piano playing skills soar forward.


snowflakes.shutterstock_115134508.jpgFor my team and I working with leading customers and business units around the globe we see that no two SAP Jam implementations are alike. Like a snow flake each one has its own unique work patterns based on their customers, industry, lines of business and culture.


As a result we must be agile and dig deep on each engagement to address a wide range of skills, requirements, work experiences which range from HR, Learning, Onboarding …to Sales, Marketing, Services, Commerce and Customer Engagement …to Communications, IT, Procurement, Operations, Communities of Practice, and User Experiences ...to working within a wide range of SAP and 3rd Party Apps and related Management Information System (MIS) environments …to the ability to write, provide visual consistency, and program management …as well as help turn complexity into …simplicity.


There are a number of best practice guidelines to consider:


ROI.Diagram.pngConsideration #1 – Getting Started!

  • Understanding the business requirements
  • Enabling overall usability
  • Translating the business process to SAP Jam
  • Ensuring relevance by way of content / communications
  • Utilizing dynamic widgets vs. static text and images
  • Assessing Change Management
  • Ensuring participation


Consideration #2 – ROI & Value

Pinpoint the SAP Jam Return On Investment (ROI) and business drivers important to your organization centered around “Time” “Money” and “People” scalability to ensure measurable ("quantifiable" and "qualifiable") gains.


Consideration #3 – Differentiators

SAP Jam is a unique market leading solution.  It seamlessly integrates social business capabilities into existing (& planned) business process whereas as other 3rd party platforms are focused on the tools.  SAP has made SAP Jam an integral part of all SAP solutions addressing:

  • All lines of business centric vs. CRM as the primary
  • One SAP Jam vision vs. multiple roadmaps which have overlaps
  • SAP’s proven 40-year history of business software, processes, and market leadership
  • Collaborative ecosystem (Out of the Box – i.e. OpenText, Box, SharePoint, etc.)
  • Application integration (i.e. OData, REST APIs) by utilizing the SAP Jam Developer Center
  • Integrated platform as a foundational principal vs. a standalone which increases costs
  • Internal & external SAP Jam group capabilities which easily set-up
  • Structured collaboration to support problem solving, issue resolution, and decision making
  • Screen and video capture
  • Mobile App alignment with SAP Jam Page Designer provides out of the box mobile capabilities


Consideration #4 – Roles & Responsibilities

When addressing an SAP Jam initiative the executive sponsor, business owner(s), and project leader must consider 3 key roles including:

  • Administrator(s) (or Power Users)
  • Content Manager(s) (& Contributors)
  • End Users


While one SAP Jam tactical action can be straight forward. Each action has a consequence on another aspect of the project or initiative.


Chess.pngFor those of us who watch (or remember) Star Trek and Spok’s 3D chess game, each move has an impact to another chess piece which may be on the board you are working on or another.  It takes a lot of SAP Jam experience to address these moves which have important relationships to other business processes.


A successful SAP Jam implementation addresses 5 phases:

  1. Preparation
  2. Realization
  3. Verification
  4. Launch
  5. Post Go-Live


Eagle.pngIt takes vision, leadership, teamwork, compelling business outcomes, and passion to build any successful community which meets either face-to-face or virtually. SAP Jam requires the same consideration to achieve successful implementations and adoption.


Whether its learning how to play the piano or SAP Jam, it takes multi-dimensional expertise to ensure that all the "keys and pedals" are optimized.


SAP Jam has many self-evident, out of the box templates and capabilities that are excellent, but to gain the full advantage it takes the right skills, work experiences, and expertise to achieve the highest level of success.



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RDB.jpgAbout the Author
Richard D. Blumberg, President, World Sales Solutions, LLC (WSS) (www.WorldSalesSolutions.com) provides 25+ years of thought leadership on a variety of "View from the Top" strategies including: Enterprise Social Business, Go-to-Market Strategies, Business Development, Talent Development, and Community Building.  He and his team are recognized SAP Jam global experts for implementations and adoption.

WSS is a SAP Service Partner for SAP Jam and long-time supporter of the SAP Community Network and the SAP Ecosystem.

Prior Blogs:
- View from the Top: Bill McDermott shares his success secrets at a #fireside chat!
- The Path to SAP Jam ROI Success

- SAP Jam Work Patterns:  The Big $ or € &/or ¥ Game Changer for a New Product Launch!
- SAP Jam: The ROI Impacting Sales Productivity

- Split Second Selling with SAP Jam - 7 Use Cases!

- The Customer Go-to-Market Imperative - Transforming Silos to Social Business and Community Building












Register now

 

Watch this demonstration to see how SAP Jam can help you:

 

  • Connect your customers, partners, and employees with information and processes to drive results
  • Improve employee engagement, boost productivity, and lower training costs
  • Accelerate the sales cycle and keep key stakeholders informed of progress and opportunities
  • Deliver a single, secure social collaboration foundation across your business

 

Sign up now to see how you can accelerate business and drive results with SAP Jam.

Register now

 

HR is moving beyond its traditional role of managing internal employee processes. More and more companies are turning to HR professionals for strategies to address critical challenges like workforce diversity and the chronic skills gap. Social collaboration is emerging as a key enabler for these efforts.

 

Discover how and why—listen to this informative recorded webinar and hear industry analyst, author, and expert Irwin Lazar explain:

 

  • How HR specialists are becoming drivers of change
  • Why short-term training is evolving into continuous learning
  • How the synergy of social, mobile, and cloud is changing employee workstyles
  • What to look for in a provider of social collaboration tools

 

Register now

 

headshot_irwinlazar.jpgFeatured speaker:

Irwin Lazar, Vice President and Service Director, Nemertes Research

A prolific author, blogger, and frequent speaker at industry events, Irwin Lazar heads up a Nemertes research team that helps enterprises quantify the value of emerging technologies.

 

Related blog post: What should companies look for in a social collaboration solution? An interview with Irwin Lazar

 

 

 

Follow SAP Social Software on Twitter: @SAPSocial

1.png

In my last blog post, I talked about how to keep a close tab on important SAP Jam groups using the new “feed navigation quick menu.” In this post, I want to talk about going laptop-less.

 

When we designed the new SAP Jam mobile app for iPhone and iPad, one of the key goals we had was to create an app with features that help mobile workers – sometimes called “road warriors” – to better collaborate with others and help them feel more connected to the rest of the organization.

 

While gathering requirements for our initial release, we received a lot of requests from mobile workers – such as sales executives and field service technicians – for features that would allow them to leave their laptop at work and live a laptop-less existence with the help of SAP Jam and their mobile device. In all fairness, today’s smart phones and tablets are becoming more and more like laptops from both a computing-power and an application-support perspective. In support of this goal, we’ve added the ability to upload and share documents directly from the SAP Jam mobile app.

 

Imagine you are Perry Johnson, a sales executive on the road visiting a key customer, Lavender Restaurant Group (LRG), which recently submitted an RFP for a 14 million USD project to add solar heating to all of their restaurant locations in California. Perry is using an iPad as his primary computer for this trip. LRG has just emailed him an updated version of the RFP based on discussions they just had. He’d like to share this with the account SWAT team and quickly get their input on whether the new provisions are possible, as he only has two days to reply to meet their deadline.

 

With the new SAP Jam mobile app for iPhone and iPad, Perry can upload a document for collaboration straight from his Safari browser or any native application with document support. In the example below, Perry uses a web email client. He opens the document by tapping on it just as he normally would.

2.png

iOS opens the document and presents Perry with a preview of the RFP. On the upper right-hand side of the preview, Perry is presented with a dialog: Open in SAP Jam. Perry taps on the dialog and SAP Jam opens the document and prepares it for upload to SAP Jam for collaboration.

3.png

4.png

Perry selects the LRG Account group to upload the document to, as he knows that a number of top solar panel engineers are closely monitoring this group in support of this potentially lucrative deal.

5.png

6.png

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With the new RFP uploaded, Perry knows that he will get a push notification as soon as the solar panel engineers have a chance to review and respond to the updated requirements. He can focus on other pressing matters, such as locating sufficient inventory for the potential project with LRG.

 

In this example, we showed how easy it is for a road warrior like Perry to live a laptop-less existence with the SAP Jam mobile app. He can not only travel more lightly, but also increase his productivity with tighter real-time collaboration with his team back at the office.

 

Download the updated SAP Jam mobile app for iPhone and iPad from the App Store today and try out a laptop-less existence for yourself.

 

Follow SAP Social Software on Twitter: @SAPSocial

Welcome to the new SAP Jam – release 1502. This release brings a variety of administrative and ease-of-use enhancements as well as several new features.  As always, the majority of enhancements in SAP Jam releases are driven directly by customer feedback. This posting will cover highlights in the following topics.

 

New work pattern

 

Personal time zone for events and calendars

 

Notifications

 

Content & content management

 

Administrative

 


New high tech manufacturing industry work pattern: Design registration for use with SAP Cloud for Customer

 

New in release 1502 is the first industry-focused work pattern: High tech manufacturing design registration. This work pattern is exclusively available to customers of SAP Cloud for Customer, enabling manufacturing companies (specifically semiconductor and component manufacturers) to collaborate and communicate with channel partners by automating the design registration life cycle to maximize channel revenue and increase design wins. Additionally, brand owners can monitor their pipeline, analyze risks, and get accurate forecasts, allowing them to understand how their business is doing.

 

Personal time zone for events and calendars

When working with meetings and events that involve colleagues in other time zones and counties, we've made it easier to keep yourself on schedule – a personalized time zone per event. In addition to being able to save the event to your personal email/calendaring application, you can now also tell SAP Jam what time zone you’d like the event represented in when you look at it, regardless of what time zone the meeting owner scheduled it in. This lets you know the correct time for your local time zone, as well as the original time zone it was scheduled in.

 

 

Notifications

notification-summary-tile.PNGNotifications tile

 

To the right of your home feed, there’s a new “notification summary” tile that gives you a quick and easy view of the different notifications you have pending. You can see how many requests you have, social updates, group invites, and tasks. Then, from the tile, you can click through to a filtered view of your notifications.

 

 

Notifications filters

The new notifications filter view allows you to quickly and easily see all your notifications, or a subset, by category.  From the filtered view, you can then take action or dismiss notifications as before, but also mass-dismiss all notifications in that category, saving you time and mouse-clicks.

 

 

 

 

Content & content management

Content ratings

content-rating.pngThe new content rating capability allows colleagues to rate documents on a one- to five-star rating. Content owners can then use the ratings to identify helpful content as well as content that need improvement. Content ratings are visible in the content list view of a group as a new column, as well as on the single-item view of the document in the right sidebar panel (where the description and details are viewed). Users can change their rating at any time in the future as you make content updates.

 

Content rank report

Group administrators can now use a new report to see the popularity of group content, utilizing the new content ratings to see how documents are rated across the entire group.

 

Image album browsing

album-browsing.pngUsers of SAP Jam asked for a way to make it easier to browse multiple images while looking at folder. We've added left (previous) and right (next) buttons that appear when looking at an image in the single-item view. Clicking either of these buttons takes you to the respective previous or next image within the same content folder.

 

Content permissions before/during upload

To prevent unintentional access or viewing of documents before their permissions have been set, we've made it possible for content owners to set permissions at the same time that they upload documents.

 

Content drafts

When working with wikis, blogs, overview pages, and forum items (questions, ideas, and discussions), drafts are conveniently saved every 10 seconds automatically by SAP Jam. You can additionally force a draft save via the “save draft” button. If you save a draft of an item, you’ll see a new drafts section at the top of the content area. When working on items, you can also add links, files and photos to your draft and these won’t appear in the content area of the group until it’s published.

 

Content versioning for images

Along with all other uploaded documents, images now support versioning, allowing you to see and keep track of prior versions. This will make it much easier for group administrators to keep track of images and make sure only the “latest” version is exposed.

 

Revert to a specific version of a document

content versions.pngThe new capability to revert to a specific version of a document makes it easier to manage versions. If you think a prior version is better than the most recent, reverting to the older one will create a new copy with the prior version’s content, while also maintaining the version history.

 

Delete specific versions of documents

If you’re a marketing or HR professional, there are occasions where having a specific version of a document that includes errors might cause problems. The new capability to delete a specific version eliminates this confusion. When looking at the prior versions of a document, a version that was deleted is indicated as being deleted, but is no longer accessible.

 

 

Administrative

 

Overview pages and links now included in consumption reports

If you like to measure the effectiveness and engagement of your SAP Jam groups, the newly added metrics will boost your reporting, giving you visibility into the performance of the various overview pages and links in reports. You can now see the metrics for all content in your group, which means you can see what content and pages aren't getting the attention they deserve.

 

Group member list report updated with new fields

Group administrators asked the SAP Jam team for a way to identify when their “1,000th” member joined (for example). To make this possible without asking your company's IT department for help, we've added the “join date” column to the group member list export (from the group member page). Additionally, the "status," "email notification setting," and "following" fields are available.

 

 

For more information

For more information about what else is included in this release, refer to the release notes on the SAP Jam help site: http://help.sap.com/sapjam

 

Be sure to review the user guides, which are now separated by role:

 

  • User guide (for everyone using SAP Jam)
  • Group admin guide (for group administrators)
  • Administrator's guide (for company administrators)
  • Mobile app user's guide (for everyone)
  • Developer's guide (for integration, our API, and more)

 

Follow SAP Social Software on Twitter: @SAPSocial

SAP Jam is the social collaboration software from SAP. While more and more customers use it, the request comes up to customize Jam to individual needs of a company. For this purpose, with the current release (1502), it´s possible to easily integrate OpenSocial applications into Jam to individualize it. During my one-week internship in the Jam team I built a simple OpenSocial gadget which expands the profile data of users by adding expertises. This document shows my first steps of developing an OpenSocial gadget and gives a short introduction of how to get started with an OpenSocial gadget.

 

 

Structure

OpenSocial apps are specified in XML. The <Module> tag indicates that the file contains a gadget. In the <ModulePrefs> information about the application like title, author or height can be defined. <Content type="html"> indicates that the content of the gadget is HTML. This content is defined in <![CDATA[ … ]]>. It can contain HTML, CSS or JavaScript. You can see a simple example of a hello world gadget below.

 

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8" ?>

<Module>

                <ModulePrefs title="Hello world gadget">

                </ModulePrefs>

                <Content type="html">

                               <![CDATA[

                                               Hello world!

                               ]]>

                </Content>

</Module>

 

To implement a gadget no special software is needed, a simple texteditor is sufficient. After writing the XML, the file has to be uploaded on a public web server, I used https://infotomb.com/. Later, only the URL of the gadget will be needed to include it into Jam.

 

 

Including in SAP Jam

Login into your SAP Jam instance, navigate to Admin page and open the OpenSocial gadgets page in the menu on the left.


goToGadgets.png

 

Now a list of all OpenSocial gadgets which are available can be seen. On top of the list in the right corner there is the link “Add OpenSocial Gadget”.

 

register.png

 

First, the URL of the uploaded file has to be inserted. Afterwards it can be decided whether the gadget should be enabled or not and if it should be a content or a profile gadget. Content gadgets can be added to a group's content section by anyone in the company with the appropriate privileges. Profile gadgets appear on the profile of each member of the company automatically.

Afterwards by clicking at “Refresh” we can see further information about the gadget and in the lower part a Preview of it (if the gadget is enabled).

The gadget information and preview of the ‘hello world gadget’ from above looks similar to the following picture:

 

infoAndPreview.png

 

Further expansion of the gadget

As said before, this gadget should be a profile extension to add special expertises of a user. Actually the functionality of the gadget has not been fully completed, the storage of inserted values is missing. Nonetheless, it shows how to generate a simple OpenSocial gadget and how to read out information from Jam with it.

 

First, I wanted to welcome the user with his or her name. Therefore I had to add a feature to the module preferences <Require feature="osapi"/>.  Afterwards, I needed to write some HTML code were the name should be displayed, for example the following:

 

<div id="content">

        <div id="greeting"> Hello <span id="current_user_id"> </span>

        </div>

</div>


In addition a JavaScript function to get the name and write it into the DOM has to be written. This function could for example be the following:

 

<script type="text/javascript">

        function init() {

            osapi.people.getViewer().execute(function(viewerData) {

            if (!viewerData.error) {

              var viewerDiv = document.getElementById('current_user_id');

              viewerDiv.innerHTML = viewerData.displayName;

            };

          });

        }

</script>

 

At least an onload handler has to be registered. This handler is executed when the gadget loads and calls the init function.

                gadgets.util.registerOnLoadHandler(init);

Now the code looks similar to the code below. Only the highlighted lines were edited compared to the hello world code.  By uploading it and including it into Jam, the preview should show “Hello <your name>”.

 

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8" ?>

<Module>

  <ModulePrefs title="Hello, world!" height="400">

    <Require feature="osapi"/>

  </ModulePrefs>

  <Content type="html">

    <![CDATA[

      <script type="text/javascript">

        function init() {

            osapi.people.getViewer().execute(function(viewerData) {

            if (!viewerData.error) {

              var viewerDiv = document.getElementById('current_user_id');

              viewerDiv.innerHTML = viewerData.displayName;

            };

          });

        }

        gadgets.util.registerOnLoadHandler(init);

      </script>

 

      <div id="content">

        <div id="greeting"> Hello <span id="current_user_id"> </span>

        </div>

      </div>

    ]]>

  </Content>

</Module>

 

After learning how to read out data, I wanted to offer a form to insert special expertises. Therefor I write the following HTML code:

 

<div id="editForm">

          <br>

          <form action="#">

            <div id="sector">

              <label>sector: </label>

              <select name="sectorInput" size="1">

                <option> sector 1</option>

                <option> sector 2</option>

                <option> sector 3</option>

                <option> sector 4</option>

                <option> sector 5</option>

              </select>

              knowledge: low

              <input type="radio" name="sectorRating" value="0">

              <input type="radio" name="sectorRating" value="1">

              <input type="radio" name="sectorRating" value="2">

              <input type="radio" name="sectorRating" value="3">

              <input type="radio" name="sectorRating" value="4"> high

            </div>

            <br>

            <div id="country">

              <label>country: </label>

              <select name="countryInput" size="1">

                <option> country1</option>

                <option> country2</option>

                <option> country3</option>

                <option> country4</option>

                <option> country5</option>

              </select>

              knowledge: low

              <input type="radio" name="countryRating" value="0">

              <input type="radio" name="countryRating" value="1">

              <input type="radio" name="countryRating" value="2">

              <input type="radio" name="countryRating" value="3">

              <input type="radio" name="countryRating" value="4"> high

            </div>

            <br>

            <div id="project">

              <label>project: </label>

              <input type="text" name="projectInput" size="50">

            </div>

            <br>

            <div id="specialist knowledge">

              <label>specialist knowledge:</label>

              <input type="text" name="specKnowledgeInput" size="50">

            </div>

            <br>

            <br>

            <input type="button" value="Save" onclick="save()"/>

          </form>

 

To format the HTML I added some CSS lines:

 

    <style type="text/css">

      label { display: inline-block; width: 100px; }

      select { display: inline-block; width: 100px; }

    </style>

 

After defining the content, I wrote a further JavaScript function to handle the button click. This save function reads out the values of the form and opens a new message which indicates that the values were saved.

At first the minimessage feature has to be added to the module preferences.

 

                <Require feature="minimessage"/>

 

Afterwards the save function had to be defined. The inserted values of the form has to be selected and a message has to be generated. In future work, these values has to be stored for later use.

 

function save(){

        var sector=document.getElementsByName('sectorInput')[0].value;

        var country=document.getElementsByName('countryInput'[0]).value;

        var project=document.getElementsByName('projectInput')[0].value;

        var specKnowledge=document.getElementsByName('specKnowledgeInput')[0].value;

       // <here the values has to be stored for later usage>

        var saveMessage = new gadgets.MiniMessage(__MODULE_ID__);

        saveMessage.createDismissibleMessage("Your expertises were saved");

}

 

 

end.png

 

Finally, here you can find the whole code of the gadget:

 

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8" ?>

<Module>

  <ModulePrefs title=" Hello world gadget" height="400">

    <Require feature="osapi"/>

    <Require feature="minimessage"/>

  </ModulePrefs>

  <Content type="html">

    <![CDATA[

      <script type="text/javascript">

        function save(){

          var sector=document.getElementsByName('sectorInput')[0].value;

          var country=document.getElementsByName('countryInput'[0]).value;

          var project=document.getElementsByName('projectInput')[0].value;

          var specKnowledge=document.getElementsByName('specKnowledgeInput')[0].value;

          var saveMessage = new gadgets.MiniMessage(__MODULE_ID__);

          saveMessage.createDismissibleMessage("Your expertises were saved");

        }

        function init() {

          osapi.people.getViewer().execute(function(viewerData) {

            if (!viewerData.error) {

              var viewerDiv = document.getElementById('current_user_id');

              viewerDiv.innerHTML = viewerData.displayName;

            };

          });

        }

        gadgets.util.registerOnLoadHandler(init);

      </script>

     

      <style type="text/css">

        label { display: inline-block; width: 100px; }

        select { display: inline-block; width: 100px; }

      </style>

     

      <div id="content">

        <div id="greeting"> Hello <span id="current_user_id"> </span>

        </div>

        <div id="editForm">

                                                                              <br>

          <form action="#">

            <div id="sector">

              <label>sector: </label>

              <select name="sectorInput" size="1">

                <option> sector 1</option>

                <option> sector 2</option>

                <option> sector 3</option>

                <option> sector 4</option>

                <option> sector 5</option>

              </select>

              knowledge: low

              <input type="radio" name="sectorRating" value="0">

              <input type="radio" name="sectorRating" value="1">

              <input type="radio" name="sectorRating" value="2">

              <input type="radio" name="sectorRating" value="3">

              <input type="radio" name="sectorRating" value="4"> high

            </div>

            <br>

            <div id="country">

              <label>country: </label>

              <select name="countryInput" size="1">

                <option> country1</option>

                <option> country2</option>

                <option> country3</option>

                <option> country4</option>

                <option> country5</option>

              </select>

              knowledge: low

              <input type="radio" name="countryRating" value="0">

              <input type="radio" name="countryRating" value="1">

              <input type="radio" name="countryRating" value="2">

              <input type="radio" name="countryRating" value="3">

              <input type="radio" name="countryRating" value="4"> high

            </div>

            <br>

            <div id="project">

              <label>project: </label>

              <input type="text" name="projectInput" size="50">

            </div>

            <br>

            <div id="specialist knowledge">

              <label>specialist knowledge:</label>

              <input type="text" name="specKnowledgeInput" size="50">

            </div>

            <br>

            <br>

            <input type="button" value="Save" onclick="save()"/>

          </form>

                                               </div>

      </div>

    ]]>

  </Content>

</Module>

 

That’s the current status of my first gadget after only a few days of studying and testing. Maybe it can help some of you to reduce fear of contact with Open Social gadgets. I think with basic knowledge of XML, HTML, CSS and JavaScript it is not very difficult to build also more complex gadgets. Further information can be found at http://help.sap.com/download/documentation/sapjam/developer/index.html#opensocial/concepts/intro.html

Join us for a live demonstration of SAP Jam and ask our product expert questions in a live, interactive webcast. In this demo, we’ll explore how to:

 

  • Connect your customers, partners, and employees with information and processes to drive results
  • Improve employee engagement, boost productivity, and lower training costs
  • Accelerate the sales cycle and keep key stakeholders informed of progress and opportunities
  • Deliver a single, secure social collaboration foundation across your business

 

Sign up now to see how you can accelerate business and drive results with SAP Jam.

 

Thursday, February 26, 2015

10 a.m. Pacific

60 minutes

Register now

Watch this video to see how you can use SAP Cloud for Sales to accelerate sales cycles by collaborating with your sales team, internal experts, customers, and partners — all in the context of your accounts and opportunities – with built-in integration to SAP Jam.

 

 

Here’s how SAP Cloud for Sales can give a salesperson the insights he needs to prepare for his day. With a complete view on accounts and opportunities – and the ability to collaborate with the right people on his sales team – he can sell smarter.

 

To get started, he sees a full view into one of his opportunities – from the latest account information to any open service tickets. With native integration to SAP ERP, he no longer has to hunt for back-office information like sales orders or invoices. It’s all there.

 

He can have relevant conversations with the customer – anytime, anywhere – so there are no surprises. He can easily create a customer fact sheet to prepare for a meeting – all with the tap of a button.

 

Next, he looks at all the other opportunities he’s working on for the account. He gets a complete list and can drill down to get the specifics. He can decide what opportunities get published to the sales forecast and decides to add this one.

 

He also needs to prepare for his meeting. A decision-maker named Paula will be there with her team. He sees a list of people who Paula has worked with before and recognizes Eric in logistics. He decides to get Eric in the loop and add him to the sales team. With SAP HANA, he can use predictive analytics to find top deal influencers and connect with them.

 

Now that he’s assembled his sales team, he sets up a deal room where they can collaborate and close the opportunity. With integration between SAP Jam and SAP Cloud for Sales, he can invite anyone to his team – even those outside sales like legal and logistics.

 

To his deal room, he adds all the relevant information like opportunity details, customer-related documents, RFPs, and presentations. He’s able to collaborate and build the best sales strategy by creating polls and discussions. He can involve other teams selling into the same industry – or against similar competitors – so they can learn from each other.

 

Based on the team’s input, he can choose the best products and solutions to propose to the customer. He can also get immediate feedback from his manager, allowing him to work on the proposal immediately.

 

He’s now ready to set up a meeting with the customer, so he creates create an appointment. He gets an email from his customer confirming that they’re ready to meet. With integration into productivity apps like Microsoft Outlook, Google Gmail, and Lotus Notes, SAP Cloud for Sales allows him to link all email conversations to specific opportunities, or even create a new opportunity – and all relevant conversations stay in one place.

 

Follow SAP Social Software on Twitter: @SAPSocial

A colleague of mine told me of frustrations with the IT department at a small organization. The IT department consisted of one lone individual tasked with helping several dozen employees at the office. His job ran the gamut from minor troubleshooting to small projects like recoding websites and databases.

 

Whenever an employee needed help with a project, however, he was notorious for refusing to commit to a timeline. When asked why, he would explain, "When you look under a rock, you never know what you'll find. Sometimes there's nothing. Sometimes there's all kinds of bugs."

 

Being a team of one, his outlook may have been justified. If he ran into an issue he didn't know how to solve, there was no one else in the organization that he could ask.

 

If you work in a larger organization, that's less of an excuse - chances are that someone has an idea for how to help. For customer service teams especially - or anyone in a customer-facing role - knowing how to best marshal the experts and knowledge at hand to solve a customer's problem quickly is key to keeping that customer relationship healthy. The more people that you call on, the more likely you are to find someone who can fix the issue.

 

Effective collaboration is just one key to good customer service. There’s also a big difference between customers who are simply satisfied and those who become loyal. Shep Hyken, a leading customer service and experience expert, says in a recently published ebook, Engage Customers With Service Excellence, that one study at Vanderbilt University found that about 25% to 40% of customers didn’t come back to a place of business even if they’d felt satisfied.

 

But how do you create a customer experience that does make customers loyal? To view all 8 lessons from Shep Hyken, register now to read the ebook.

 

Engage Customers With Service Excellence

Lessons on ways to create an amazing customer experience by Shep Hyken, customer service experience expert, New York Times and Wall Street Journal bestselling author.

 

shep_hyken_ebook.png

 

Follow SAP Social Software on Twitter: @SAPSocial

Village.PNGLearn how a small city government experienced rapid growth and the need for social collaboration to resolve its communication flow issue challenges using a single cloud solution.


Read the latest Success in the Cloud blog with SAP JAM customer, Village of Schaumburg:

http://blogs.sap.com/innovation/cloud-computing/the-village-of-schaumburg-cloud-technology-brings-efficiency-021873021


With SAP JAM and SAP JAM Mobile, they achieved "Progress Through Thoughtful Planning"  – they now Run Simple.

On February 11, 2015, we’ll be hosting a live webcast, Driving Workforce Change with Social Collaboration, which features Irwin Lazar, vice president and service director at Nemertes Research. Irwin is a prolific author, blogger, and frequent speaker at industry events, and heads up a Nemertes research team that helps enterprises quantify the value of emerging technologies.

 

PILOTHOUSE_TOP_PROVIDER_LOGO.jpgIrwin and his team recently published a Nemertes PilotHouse Top Provider report that ranked enterprise social collaboration vendors for their technology, value, and customer service. Leading up to the webcast, we sat down with Irwin to hear his thoughts on the evolution of social technology – who the buyers are, why they buy it, and what buyers should be looking for.

 

In Part 1, find out who buys enterprise social collaboration tools and why they buy them. Part 2 continues below.

 

What should a company look for in an ideal social collaboration solution?

 

headshot_irwinlazar.jpgIrwin Lazar: As you think about buying a solution for your own organization, the first things that usually come into play are what are your retention requirements, what are your security requirements, and can you have sensitive corporate conversations in a system that lives on a cloud provider? For some companies, especially in highly regulated industries, that might be a factor.

 

Integration with the rest of the environment is another factor. As I mentioned earlier, the most successful social software deployments are those that are tied into business processes and business process applications. If you just throw a social platform out there and say, “Okay everybody, start collaborating,” it generally doesn’t work.

 

It’s also important to get support for things like developing custom applications and developing hooks into desktop and business process applications.

 

"The most successful social software deployments are those that are tied into business processes and business process applications"

I just had a conversation with a large financial services firm. They invested in one of your competitors but they’re finding no one’s using it. We talked about how they deployed it and they said, “We just put it out there and we identified some folks who we thought would be good candidates to start using it, but nobody joined in.”

 

We asked, “Have you tied it into your ERP or your CRM or your other enterprise software?” They said no. Well, there’s the problem right there. The single biggest success factor and the single biggest thing to look for is the ability to integrate with the applications that drive your business.

 

Another area we looked into in the report was the ability to support mobile work. We’re seeing massive growth in people relying on their smartphones and tablets. It’s the primary means of work for roughly 20% of typical employees now. They’re primarily using their tablet and then going to their desktop when they have to. So a social tool should support the mobile user as well as the desktop user.

 

The features that social tools support are also important. One of the popular use cases we’re seeing around social is innovation and idea management – being able to collect ideas, vote on them, discuss them, move them up and down, and then being able to share them or collect them from across business units. That’s a pretty powerful use for a social tool and one that’s pretty much impossible to do with email.

 

Another feature we see companies looking at are the analytics: What can I learn from how the social network is used within my organization? Who are the key connectors in my organization? What are the things being discussed?

 

One last one I’ll mention is that the tool should easily point me towards discussions that are of interest to me. LinkedIn, for instance, tell you a discussion might be of interest to you if people you worked with are in the discussion.

 

So all of those taken together are critical buying factors: The features, the ability to integrate with business process applications, the support for mobility, and the ability to support varying deployment models.

 

How should organizations respond to the growing number of millennials in the workplace and the popularity of social technology?

 

Irwin Lazar: I think the successful companies will invest in the kinds of tools that people are used to using in their personal lives.

 

"Successful companies will invest in the kinds of tools that people are used to using in their personal lives"

The kind of informal, chat-based quick communications that are available on mobile devices as well as desktop devices – those are the kinds of ways that people expect to collaborate. They expect to be able to capture videos, comment on stuff, share stuff that’s interesting.

 

Those kinds of social features are what the younger generation is living in. And that’s what they expect when they walk into the office. If you give somebody an email inbox or a telephone and say here’s how you collaborate, they’re going to go back and start using those consumer services for work – and it’ll get out of your control.

 

That’s how we see it time and time again with companies that we consult for. Everything under the sun is being used for work and it’s out of the control of the folks that are responsible for security, document retention, discoverability, and so on.

 

 

Follow SAP Social Software on Twitter: @SAPSocial

On February 11, 2015, we’ll be hosting a live webcast, Driving Workforce Change with Social Collaboration, which features Irwin Lazar, vice president and service director at Nemertes Research. Irwin is a prolific author, blogger, and frequent speaker at industry events, and heads up a Nemertes research team that helps enterprises quantify the value of emerging technologies.

 

PILOTHOUSE_TOP_PROVIDER_LOGO.jpgIrwin and his team recently published a Nemertes PilotHouse Top Provider report that ranked enterprise social collaboration vendors for their technology, value, and customer service. Leading up to the webcast, we sat down with Irwin to hear his thoughts on the evolution of social technology – who the buyers are, why they buy it, and what buyers should be looking for.

 

Who buys social collaboration tools in the enterprise? Is it a specific line of business or is it IT?

 

headshot_irwinlazar.jpgIrwin Lazar: In addition to the PilotHouse report, we do an annual benchmark where we gather data from about 200 companies year over year. One of the areas that we look at is social collaboration and adoption.

 

It’s still kind of all over the map. Very few companies have a group whose charge is to develop an internal social collaboration strategy, to deploy a social platform, to manage it, to grow the community, and so on.  It’s only about 6% of companies that have that kind of structure.

 

"In about 30% of companies, lines of business go out and buy something tied to specific applications"

In the rest, you see a little bit of everything. Sometimes it falls under the domain of folks responsible for other collaboration applications like SharePoint, email, document collaboration, etc. Sometimes it falls under the telecom group because they’re the ones that handle unified communications, and because people see social as part of collaboration, they get ownership of that, too.  Often, it could just be a dedicated application group running within IT. That’s about 22% of organizations.

 

In about 30% of companies, lines of business go out and buy something tied to specific applications that they’re using for operational processes – companies that are SAP shops buy SAP Jam, or companies that use Salesforce get Chatter, for example. Or individuals buy a couple of licenses or they download a freemium version for their team. They start playing with it because somebody thought it would be really cool to try. Those are probably the least successful deployments. They tend to start pretty quickly but fizzle out if you haven’t tied your social tools into your business processes or other applications. There’s no one actively helping grow that community, no executive buy-in, and so on.

 

We talked to one company that started using Yammer and very quickly had a lot of people using it – it was a great way to exchange information. But within a few months, it was “Where we are going for happy hour?” and “Who shall I start this Sunday on my fantasy football team?”

 

Why are enterprises buying social collaboration tools?

 

Irwin Lazar: The biggest reason is simply because they are looking for better ways to collaborate – they’re looking for ways to collaborate in context.

 

When you talk to folks about what’s attracting them to social tools, they say, “I use Facebook in my personal life to collaborate with my friends and plan events and activities. Why can’t I do that when I get to the office? Why do I get an inbox? There’s got to be a better way.” People are looking to leverage the kinds of things they do in their personal lives within the corporate environment.

 

"They’re looking for ways to collaborate in context"

The amount of time people spend searching their emails for discussions that are relevant to a particular project, product, or process they’re working on is not a great way to use their time – that’s the single biggest reason.

 

We asked folks what their primary driver was for purchasing social tools and 76% said “We want to improve the ability of our folks to collaborate both internally and externally.”

 

Only about 14% had a measurable business case where they said, hey, if we deploy social it will lead to X percent increase in revenues, X percent decrease in cost. That’s very difficult to measure for any collaboration application – not just social tools but others as well, like unified communication, video conferencing, etc.

 

 

Follow SAP Social Software on Twitter: @SAPSocial

10 a.m. Pacific, February 11, 2015 - Register today

 

HR is moving beyond its traditional role of managing internal employee processes. More and more companies are turning to HR professionals for strategies to address critical challenges like workforce diversity and the chronic skills gap. Social collaboration is emerging as a key enabler for these efforts.

 

Discover how and why—attend this informative webinar and hear industry analyst, author, and expert Irwin Lazar explain:

 

  • How HR specialists are becoming drivers of change
  • Why short-term training is evolving into continuous learning
  • How the synergy of social, mobile, and cloud is changing employee workstyles
  • What to look for in a provider of social collaboration tools

 

Register today

 

headshot_irwinlazar.jpgFeatured speaker:

Irwin Lazar, Vice President and Service Director, Nemertes Research

A prolific author, blogger, and frequent speaker at industry events, Irwin Lazar heads up a Nemertes research team that helps enterprises quantify the value of emerging technologies.

 

Related blog post: What should companies look for in a social collaboration solution? An interview with Irwin Lazar

 

 

 

Follow SAP Social Software on Twitter: @SAPSocial

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