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;\ New BSP Weblogs

Brian McKellar
Currently Being Moderated

This thread is dedicated to publishing new weblogs. Do not append any comments onto this thread! Only if you have written a weblog, then append a small description with the link here.

 

For everyone else that are interested, press the <b>"Watch this Topic"</b> option at the start of the thread. Next click <b>"Watch Options"</b>, check "Email Updates", and "Update Watches". Then, whenever a new append is made to this thread, SDN will send an email to all watchers. This is effectively a very cheap "heads up" on new (BSP) related weblogs.

 

For a complete overview of all BSP related Weblogs, see:

https://www.sdn.sap.com/sdn/weblogs.sdn?blog=/weblogs/topic/24

 

<b>WARNING: Do NOT append anything else on this thread, as any new append will trigger a flood of emails to all three (thousand?) people on the watch list!</b>

 

++bcm

  • 1. BSP Trouble Shooting: Getting Help
    Brian McKellar
    Currently Being Moderated

    <b>BSP Trouble Shooting: Getting Help</b>

    /people/brian.mckellar/blog/2004/06/11/bsp-trouble-shooting-getting-help

    <i>Every other day, the simple question comes up: “How to do X?”, usually with the qualifiers “Help!”, “Urgent!” or “????”. Most of these questions, when reading between the lines also contain the additional qualifier “I have not read the documentation”. Don't let this happen to you! This Weblog attempts to point to interesting and relevant sources of information to get BSP developers quickly up to speed. It is not an answer to any question; no, it is the pointer to the answers!</i>

  • 2. BSP Performance: 3 part series
    Brian McKellar
    Currently Being Moderated

    <b>BSP Performance: Measuring Roundtrip Latency</b>

    /people/brian.mckellar/blog/2004/06/16/bsp-performance-measuring-roundtrip-latency

    <i>This Weblog will show a step-by-step example of measuring the HTTP roundtrip latency for a "Hello World" BSP page. This can be used as baseline to determine the actual latency of the network and the BSP runtime.</i>

     

    <b>BSP Performance: Statistic Records for Server Latency</b>

    /people/brian.mckellar/blog/2004/06/17/bsp-performance-statistic-records-for-server-latency

    <i>In a previous Weblog we looked at the HTTP roundtrip latency for a "Hello World" BSP page. However, this included a large network component (especially when working from home!), and did not reflect the true server load per request. In this Weblog we use statistic records to show quickly what is the processing time on the server for each HTTP request.</i>

     

    <b>BSP Performance: Determining Hotspots</b>

    /people/brian.mckellar/blog/2004/06/20/bsp-performance-determining-hotspots

    <i>Knowing the HTTP roundtrip latency and the server execution time is fine, but still does not satisfy our curiosity. What is the server doing? What is taking so long? Typically when colleagues have performance problems with the BSP applications, we show them first what is the real lantency of the BSP roundtime for a "Hello World" BSP page. Any larger number means application time. And of course comes now the confusing question: what is the application doing? This Weblog shows how to see exactly what the application is doing at a very fine granular level.</i>

  • 3. BSP u0096 a Developeru0092s Journal: Part I & II
    Thomas Jung
    Currently Being Moderated

    <b>BSP – a Developer’s Journal: Part I Introduction</b>

    /people/thomas.jung3/blog/2004/06/17/bsp-150-a-developer146s-journal-part-i-introduction

    Welcome to the first of a series of weblogs on BSP development. This is a journal of sorts of our experiences during our rollout of the BSP development tool.

     

     

    <b>BSP – a Developer’s Journal: Part II - System Layout</b>

    /people/thomas.jung3/blog/2004/06/18/bsp-150-a-developer146s-journal-part-ii--system-layout

    Part II of the BSP Developer's Journal. In this edition we look at the process to get our system environment setup.

  • 4. BSP u0096 a Developeru0092s Journal: Part III
    Thomas Jung
    Currently Being Moderated

    <b>BSP - a Developer's Journal: Part III - Impact on our Development Team</b>

    /people/thomas.jung3/blog/2004/06/22/bsp-150-a-developer146s-journal-part-iii-impact-on-our-development-team

    Welcome to the third in a series of weblogs on BSP development. In this installment we look at the early impact this new tool had on our development team.

  • 5. BSP u0096 a Developeru0092s Journal: Part IV
    Thomas Jung
    Currently Being Moderated

    <b>BSP – a Developer’s Journal: Part IV- RFCs and the BAPI Browser</b>

    /people/thomas.jung3/blog/2004/06/23/bsp-150-a-developer146s-journal-part-iv-rfcs-and-the-bapi-browser

    In this weblog we will explorer RFC - the main tool a BSP developer will use to access application data from backend SAP systems.

  • 6. Re: New BSP Weblogs
    Thomas Jung
    Currently Being Moderated

    <b>BSP – a Developer’s Journal: Part V- XML for RFCs</b>

    /people/thomas.jung3/blog/2004/06/24/bsp-150-a-developer146s-journal-part-v-xml-for-rfcs

    In this weblog we will look at the use of XML to avoid fixed interfaces in RFC calls.

  • 7. Re: New BSP Weblogs
    Brian McKellar
    Currently Being Moderated

    <b>BSP Programming: RSS = HttpClient + XML + XSLT</b>

    /people/brian.mckellar/blog/2004/06/25/bsp-programming-rss-httpclient-xml-xslt

    This weblog just highlights the use of BSP, XML, XSLT and the HTTP Client in one example. The coding reads a RSS feed from SDN and displays the data in a nicely formatted fashion.

  • 8. Re: New BSP Weblogs
    Brian McKellar
    Currently Being Moderated

    BSP Programming: Writing a Web Crawler

    <b>/people/brian.mckellar/blog/2004/07/05/bsp-programming-writing-a-simple-web-crawler

    This weblog shows how to write a simple web crawler using the browser (Html viewer control) integrated into the SAPGUI.

  • 9. New BSP Weblogs
    Thomas Jung
    Currently Being Moderated

    <b>BSP – a Developer’s Journal: Part VI - Example application with customer BSP Extensions and Design 2003 themes</b>

    /people/thomas.jung3/blog/2004/07/06/bsp-150-a-developer146s-journal-part-vi--example-application-with-customer-bsp-extensions-and-design-2003-themes

    In this Weblog we will look a completed application focusing on the use of Customer created BSP Extensions and Design 2003 themes.

  • 10. Re: New BSP Weblogs
    Brian McKellar
    Currently Being Moderated

    <b>BSP Programming: Crawling SDN</b>

    /people/brian.mckellar/blog/2004/07/06/bsp-programming-crawling-sdn

    In a first weblog, a simple web crawler was built using the browser (Html viewer control) integrated into the SAPGUI. In this weblog, the web crawler is used to pull some information from SDN. There after the HTMLB chart is used to see what has happened in the last year.

  • 11. Re: New BSP Weblogs
    Thomas Jung
    Currently Being Moderated

    <b>BSP – a Developer’s Journal: Part VII - Dealing with multiple languages (English, German, Spanish, Thai, and Polish)</b>

    /people/thomas.jung3/blog/2004/07/13/bsp-150-a-developer146s-journal-part-vii--dealing-with-multiple-languages-english-german-spanish-thai-and-polish

    In this installment of the BSP Developer's Journal, we will look at the extensive Multi-language capabilities in the WebAS and BSP.

  • 12. Re: New BSP Weblogs
    Brian McKellar
    Currently Being Moderated

    <b>BSP In-Depth: Using the HTMLB Event System</b>

    /people/brian.mckellar/blog/2004/07/18/bsp-in-depth-using-the-htmlb-event-system

    This weblog shows how to write a very simple control that can hook into the HTMLB event system, and make its functionality available for general use. It very technical in nature, and not recommended for lightweight reading. The target audience are developers writing own BSP extension libraries, or using HTML or JavaScript code in combination with the HTMLB family of libraries.

  • 13. Re: New BSP Weblogs
    Brian McKellar
    Currently Being Moderated

    <a href="https://www.sdn.sap.comhttp://www.sdn.sap.comhttp://www.sdn.sap.com/irj/servlet/prt/portal/prtroot/com.sapportals.km.docs/documents/a1-8-4/how%20to%20generate%20and%20display%20svg%20graphics%20in%20abap,%20Part%201.article"><b>How to Generate and Display SVG Graphics in ABAP, Part 1</b></a>

     

    By Siarhei Ulasenka

     

    The purpose of this article is to demonstrate ease of use of Scalable Vector Graphics (SVG) in a seemingly unsuitable environment like BSP and ABAP applications. You can start with this tutorial and decide if you need to get know SVG in more detail later. The first article shows you how to create and display a simple SVG graphics in a BSP application and in an ABAP report. In the second part you will become familiar with some server-side and client-side scripting and create a dynamic SVG flight chart.

     

    Small comments:

    The <phtmlb:ganttChart> also uses SVG for rendering. Also the SAP Visual Composer uses SVG to get that superb rendering. Interesting technology.

  • 14. Re: New BSP Weblogs
    Brian McKellar
    Currently Being Moderated

    <b>BSP Programming: Writing Composite Elements</b>

    /people/brian.mckellar/blog/2004/07/28/bsp-programming-writing-composite-elements

    Composite BSP elements are excellent “cookie-cutters”. Composite BSP elements are built by combining other BSP elements into new elements. A composite element represents a pattern that can be used many times, always giving the same results. The benefit of such composite BSP elements is that layout-relevant rendering can be grouped into one BSP element that can easily be changed even late in a project. This technique also reduces the amount of source code on each page, and reduces the clutter.

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