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Introduction

During this session, you will learn the tips and trick used to successfully recover your system from failure due to several different factors like miss configuration changes and unexpected outages in the hardware and software. The tools and how to use them are demonstrated during this presentation. With this session, you will learn what you need to know if your system is unavailable because unexpected and/or unknown errors. We will start the presentation with a short overview of troubleshooting and then will talk about tools that helps to troubleshoot different issues in the SAP systems. This presentation will try to cover as much examples and expertise as possible in all the particular areas. Hope to see you there!
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1. Configuration Overview.

To successfully configure the CCMS agents and Email alerts to be sent from a Central System (CEN) it’s necessary to complete the following additional tasks: a. Configure SMTP in the Central system (CEN) by enabling the built-in SMTP plug-in (as of BASIS release 6.x). This step in not part on this configuration guide, please refer to OSS Note 455140 for installation instructions and additional information. b. Install the CCMS agents in each satellite system you want to enable alerts and emails; this is necessary because CEN alerts are handled by the remote CCMS agents; this step will be covered in another forthcoming configuration guide. c. Configure the alerts in the CEN system by enabling the emails selecting the correct monitoring object and configuring email destinations properly.

2. CEN and Alerts Configuration.

a. Logon to Solution Manager and call transaction RZ21, from this screen select the following options and hit Display Overview button. image Note: This will show all the remote CCMS agents with its current status, look for the SID you currently have registered at Solution Manager system. If you didn’t find an entry please check the registration procedures again (this will be shown in other configuration guide).

3. Email and Alert configuration.

As of Release 6.x, you can define central auto-reaction methods as part of the central monitoring of NetWeaver components in the CCMS monitoring architecture. The auto-reaction methods are not started in the system in which the alert occurs, but in the central monitoring system. a. Logon to the CEN system, in our case this is the Solution Manager instance and call transaction RZ21 and select Technical infrastructure -> Assign central auto-reactions. In this screen, you can execute all the steps for defining, assigning and processing central auto-reaction methods. image

- Defining the central auto-reaction method:

a. Select the Create pushbutton in the Defined Central Auto Reactions sub window. In the following dialog box, enter the desired name for the method in the input field next to the Create pushbutton and then select the Create pushbutton. image image b. You reach the Monitoring: Methods screen. Enter the desired settings of the method (report/function module to be executed, corresponding parameters) and ensure that you leave the checkbox Only in the central system, triggered via CCMS agents activated; see screens below: image image image image c. Save your entries. The method is then immediately displayed in the Defined Central Auto-Reaction sub window. image

- Assigning the central auto-reaction method:

d. Specify the MTE classes and the systems that you want to assign to a central auto-reaction method. The system regularly checks the assignment. image image e. In the System ID sub window, select the systems and in the MTEclass sub window, select the MTE classes that you want to assign to a central auto-reaction method. You can also select several systems and MTE classes in each case. image f. In the Defined Central Auto-Reaction sub window, select the method that you want to assign to the selected MTE classes of the selected systems. g. Select the Assign central auto-reaction pushbutton. The corresponding assignments are immediately displayed in the lower sub window. h. Execute these steps for all desired central auto-reaction methods you want to configure alerting. The central auto-reaction methods are always started under the user in the client that activated the central method dispatcher. To do this, select the Technical infrastructure menu option in transaction RZ21 Method execution -> Activate central system dispatching. Since the client is also extremely important for automatic alert notification, make sure you are in the client from which mails are to be sent when you activate the central system dispatching. image If you activated the central system dispatching under the incorrect user or client, deactivate it by deleting the SAP_CCMS_CENSYS_DISPATCHER job in transaction SM37. The job is controlled by the SAP_CSM_TRIGGER_CENSYS_DISPATCH event. Afterwards, activate the central system dispatching again under the correct user in the required client.

Related Solution Manager configuration guides on SDN

System Monitoring configuration guide for Dummies

Service Desk configuration guide for dummies.

SDCC - Service Data Control Center configuration guide for Dummies.

CCMS Rule Based Monitors configuration guide for Dummies

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1. Creating a Rule Based Monitor Set.

 

 

a.

You can choose several objects to monitor in a NetWeaver system; I have my own favorite list of those objects I think are the most important and useful to monitor in a system, and they are:

- CPU_Utilization
- OS_COL_STATE
- R3AbapSqlError
- R3DialogResponseTime
- FilesystemPercentageUsed
- PageFaults
- R3BPServerSpecAbortedJobs
- R3BufferHitRatio
- R3BufferSwap
- R3Syslog
- R3_SI_SystemInfo



b.

In transaction

RZ20

select

Extras --> Activate Maintenance Functions

.

c.

Go to

Monitor (Set) --> Create

, you will get to the following screen:

 

image

 

The following dialog will appear:

 

image

 

f.

Select

Rule node

and hit the

Continue

button.

g.

In the next dialog select

CCMS_DEFINE_R3_SYSTEMS

as the rule definition and hit

Continue

button.

 

image

 

button.

 

image

 

i.

Your new monitor definition based on rules should look like this:

 

image

 

NOTE:

Please remember that we are creating a Rule Based Monitor, we need to make sure NO object has been checked from the

Selectable MTE

tree.

j.

The next step is to create the Virtual node to group all the MTEs that we should select from the MTE Classes shown in point a. To do this, click on 

CCMS_DEFINE_R3_SYSTEMS

if it is not already selected and hit

Create Nodes (F5)

button from the toolbox icons, you will get the following dialog:

 

image

 

k.

Now select

Virtual Node

and hit the

Continue

button.

l.

In the

Name

field write something like: Test Rule Based Monitors and hit the

Continue

button.

 

image

 

m.

Now your monitor should look like this:

 

image

 

n.

Now click under Test Rule Based Monitors to select them and then hit on

Create Nodes (F5)

choose

Rule Based

and hit

Continue

button.

o.

On the next screen select

CCMS_GET_MTE_BY_CLASS

as the rule name and the hit the

Continue

button.

 

image

 

p.

Now we need to add each MTE Class from point a. to the following screen on the

MTEClass

parameter value, select all of them and hit

Continue

button.

 

image

 

q.

At this point your monitor definition should look like this:

 

image

 

r.

The next step is to include all

MTE Classes

already defined in point a. you will need to repeat these steps for each additional Class you want to add to the monitor set.

s.

After all classes has been included into the monitoring set hit the

Save

button from the toolbox.

t.

You will be prompted for a monitor name, write something meaningful.

The new Monitor Set should look like this:

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I will assume you have already installed SAP Solution Manager 3.2 with the latest support packs and related plug-ins and you have not configured any Solution in the system yet.

 

1. Creating a new Solution.

 

 

a.

Start transaction

DSWP.

 

The following screen will be shown:

 

image

 

b.

Hit

New

button to create a new solution in Solution Manager.

 

image

 

c.

Complete the required fields:

- Solution Name:

Your New Solution Name.


- Customer Number:

You SAP Customer Number

you can obtain this information in the SAP Service Marketplace.
- Original Language.

d.

Hit the

Continue

button to create the new solution.

e.

The new solution will be then displayed, in our case we have created solution

NetWeaver System Landscape

as an example for this blog.

 

image

 

2. Creating the Host and the Database.

 

 

a.

Start transaction

SMSY

.

 

The following screen will be shown:

 

image

 

b.

Right click under

Server

and select the option

Create New Server

.

 

image

 

The following screen will be shown:

image

 

c.

In the

Server

field, complete with the server name you want to add to Solution Manager.

 

image

 

d.

Hit the image to create the new server.

 

Verify the new server was created successfully without errors.

 

image

 

e.

Double click on the

Server Name

you have created in order to switch to the server properties.

 

image

 

f.

Complete as much information as possible in every system field, then save the changes pressing the image button.

 

g.

Double click under

Databases

and select

Create New Database

in order to add the database instance in the Solution Manager system.

 

image

 

The following screen will be shown:

image

 

h.

Press

F4

under the database field and select your database, if nothing is being displayed you will need to insert the database instance name manually.

i.

Hit the image to create the new database instance.

 

Verify the new database was created successfully without errors.

 

image

 

j.

Double click on the

Database Name

you have created in order to switch to the database properties.

 

image

 

k.

Press

F4

under Manufacturer and Release fields in order to select your database vendor and version.

l.

Press

F4

under Server and select your server name from the list as shown below:

 

image

 

3. Creating the new system using the Wizard mode.

 

 

a.

Double click under

Systems

and select

Create New System with Assistant

in order to add the new system in the Solution Manager.

 

image

 

The following screen will be shown:

 

image

 

b.

Select image button.

 

image

 

Select image button to continue.

 

image

 

e.

Check every option as desired.

f.

Select image button to continue.

 

image

 

g.

Complete the

System Number, Message Server and Installation Number

with the appropriated information.

h.

Select image button to continue.

 

image

 

i.

Check

Generate RFC Destinations and Assign Logical Components

then complete the

Client

with the appropriated client information.

 

The following screen will be shown:

 

image

 

j.

Exit the wizard with

Complete

button.

 

4. Creating the RFC Destinations using the Wizard mode.

 

 

After the new instance was successfully added into Solution Manager, the system will automatically start a new wizard to create the RFC Destination in the satellite system and in the Solution Manager system itself.

 

image

 

a.

Select image button to continue.

 

image

 

b.

In this screen you will select which RFC destination you want to create with the help of the wizard, in our current example we have selected

Customizing Distribution

only. Then you will need to select which type of authentication to configure in the RFC’s,

Trusted System RFC Connection

is the best option since you won’t need to introduce the User and Password every time the system call this RFC.
But you will need to have the proper authorizations to allow Trusted RFC’s to work smoothly, check OSS Note #637429 for additional information on this matter.

c.

Select image button to continue.

 

image

 

d.

Now you will need to specify the User and Password (choose option

Generate User, Specify Password

from the drop-down list). When completed hit the image button.

 

image

 

e.

In this step you will need to check

Generate Incoming RFC Connection

; again you will need to specify User and Password, as shown below:

 

image

 

f.

Select image button to continue.

 

image

 

g.

Depending on your current instance configuration check the option

Load Distribution

.

h.

Select image button to continue.

 

image

 

i.

Now check the option

Assign RFC Connection for System Monitoring

. Since we will configure the monitoring later, you need to have this option enabled.

j.

Select image button to continue.

 

image

 

k.

Now hit

Complete

button to exit the wizard and the following screen will be shown:

 

image

 

Note:

You will be prompted several times to introduce the user and password, this is due to the fact the system needs to connect to the satellite system in order to create the RFC’s depending on your previous selections, this screen may appears three times; be sure you have proper authorizations in the target system.

 

5. Creating and Assigning Logical Components using Wizard mode.

 

 

The following screen will be automatically shown after successfully completion of the previous step.

 

image

 

a.

Select image button to start the wizard.

 

image

 

b.

In this step you will have to assign the system to a

Logical Component

to do this press

F4

under Logical Components field, the following screen will be shown:

 

image

 

c.

Check the box behind your selection:

 

image

 

d.

Select image to return.

 

image

 

e.

Now you will have the option to select the

System Role

from the drop down list, make your choice

 

image

 

f.

Specify the

Client

in the client field.

 

image

 

g.

Now review your selections, then hit image button to proceed.

 

image

 

h.

Now hit

Complete

button to exit the wizard.

 

6. Assign the System to the Logical Component.

 

 

a.

In transaction

SMSY

select

System Groups and Logical Components

then expand

Solution Landscapes – Operation

and double click on your newly created Solution Landscape; the following screen will be shown:

 

image

 

b.

Switch to

Change Mode

and from the

Logical Component

field expand from the matchcode; the following screen will be shown:

 

image

 

c.

Check the box behind your Product; the following screen will be shown:

 

image

 

d.

Expand to the right; the following screen will be shown:

 

image

 

e.

In this step we will remove any unused System Role in the landscape, to do this select the

System Roles

button, the following screen will be shown:

 

image

 

image

 

f.

Remove any unused entry and select

Continue

button.

 

After removing, the Landscape will be like this:

 

image

 

g.

Now you will need to Activate/Enable the system into the Landscape, this is an important step since otherwise you will NOT be able to setup System Monitoring through SOLUTION_MANAGER transaction, see screen below:

 

image

 

7. Enabling System Monitoring.

 

 

a.

Start transaction

DSWP or SOLUTION_MANAGER

, the following screen will be shown:

 

image

 

b.

Hit

Operation Setup

and then

Setup System Monitoring

to configure the required settings.

c.

You will need also to activate the

Automatic Refresh of Alerts

to perform this, go to the

Solution Overview

and select your Solution, the following screen will be shown:

 

image

 

d.

Click on the marked button to active the refresh.

e.

Now, in Operation, select

Solution Monitoring --> System Monitoring

as shown below:

 

image

 

f.

After you select the option to show

System Monitoring

in your Solution the recently added system must be show, see picture below:

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1. Configuring the NetWeaver system.

a. Log into the SAP system. b. Go into SE38 for the Preparation Check procedure. c. In the program field = RTCCTOOL d. Then hit Execute button. The following screen will be shown: image Depending on your current location you should need to select the corresponding nearest SAPSERV system, then leave the defaults values and click (image) button. The following screen should appear: image You will need to check every Red status item and read the associated OSS note to correct the issue first. e. Then hit Addons&Upgr button. image f. Execute Procedure after add-on implementation button, only in case of the Red cross. The following screen should appear next: image Depending on your current version, the comment information shown above could be different. g. Hit the (image) check. The next screen should only have green checks now: image

2. Configuring transaction SDCCN.

a. Call transaction SDCCN. b. Choose from the menu Utilities --> Activate image c. Confirm with Yes. image d. Confirm with Yes. image e. Confirm with Yes. image f. Confirm with (image). image g. Confirm with (image). image h. Confirm with (image). Now, the following screen should appear: image Click Back button. image

3. Configuring connection to Solution Manager.

a. From the menu select Go To --> Settings --> Task-specific. The following screen should appear: image b. Highlight RFC Destinations --> Settings. c. Click on the square/table next to Settings. image d. Switch to Change mode. e. Click Add RFC Destination button. f. Enter a description like My Solution Manager Destination. image g. Open the matchcode or press F4 in Destination field. h. Choose your Solution Manager RFC destination. Note: This destination should already exist or must be configured manually through transaction SM59. image Example: image i. Hit (image) check. image j. Select the Solution Manager destination recently created. k. Click Set Master SAP Solution Manager System button. l. Check Destination field and select Solution_Manager from the matchcode. image m. Hit (image) check twice. image n. Confirm with Yes. image o. Hit Back. p. Hit Refresh button. image

4. Starting first Service Preparation Check.

a. Highlight Service Preparation check. Then Edit --> start now. image b. Confirm with Yes. image c. Confirm with Yes. image d. Confirm with Back button. image e. Confirm with Yes. The following screen will be shown: image Congratulation, you have successfully activated the new SDCC transaction and configured the EWA connection to your Solution Manager system.

Related Solution Manager configuration guides on SDN

System Monitoring configuration guide for Dummies

Service Desk configuration guide for dummies.

CCMS Rule Based Monitors configuration guide for Dummies

http://www.sdn.sap.com/irj/servlet/prt/portal/prtroot/docs/webcontent/uuid/925b02f9-0b01-0010-bbbf-c68268bb3c41" width="235"/> http://www.sdn.sap.com/irj/servlet/prt/portal/prtroot/docs/webcontent/uuid/7ec202f9-0b01-0010-589e-a51bcd596fed" width="235"/> The NetWeaver platform is made up of several different components such as database processes, work processes, memory buffers, table structure and data, hardware parts like the CPU, main memory, disk drives and network. All these pieces work smoothly and interact together. If for any reason one of them fails or reaches its maximum performance boundaries, the overall health of the entire system will then be compromised and response time performance will drastically be affected in a negative way. We can define three major groups within performance analysis and tuning: 1. Technical layer group. 2. Application layer group. 3. Hardware layer group. 1) The Technical layer focuses mostly on analyzing and optimizing performance in the database interface, index definition and creation, core NetWeaver components like work process distribution, memory area sizing and table buffering. In this group, you will need to perform a thorough workload analysis and then change and/or enhance the system settings to accomplish positive performance results. 2) The Application layer is directly related to the program code. Unnecessary database calls, inefficient program design and poor use of available programs are the root cause of performance bottlenecks in a system. In this group, you will need to individually detect and correct the reason why it is currently impacting response times by analyzing the program code itself and fixing it accordingly. 3) In the Hardware layer, components like disk drives, CPU, network and main memory are key factors that will play a critical role in terms of performance. In this group, the hardware will be analyzed for bottlenecks to see if any of the above components has reached its limits and is negatively affecting the overall response times of your NetWeaver component; for example, if there is a hot spot in a database due to a slow disk drive. Along this journey you will learn to use the ASV method, a three step performance optimization approach, which goes as follows: - Analyze the problem: When dealing with performance issues always perform an initial analysis to determine at which of the component levels one of the interacting pieces is causing the bottleneck. Making a change to a system component such as to the software itself or even to the hardware without prior analysis is absolutely not recommended at all. - Small change: During the initial analysis you can find several different components in which enhancements can be performed. Always use caution and take only one step at a time. Never perform more than one change at once. You will otherwise never know exactly which one is successful or even which is the one that could cause undesired results. - Verify the results: After every change, always perform a new analysis to verify whether or not the enhancement has provided those desired results you were looking for. This is a cyclic redundant process. When one performance bottleneck is cleared a new one is just arriving to the table and you will need to start another ASV process again. That will keep you busy and happy for some time. Welcome to the journey!!!

- First Station: Know your tools.

The first stop in this performance journey is to know the tools that are available for you to perform every individual assessment. Each one of them will give you precise help in a particular area and will provide you with precious information that should be later used to make an initial conclusion and hence the desired change in the specific component. Once you are familiar with all the family members of the workload analysis and tuning tools the ASV process approach should be started. The following standard tools included in the NetWeaver platform are those I have chosen as my Top 10 list, and they are: 1. Workload Monitor (ST03N) 2. Tune Buffers Monitor (ST02) 3. Statistical Records (STAD) 4. SQL Trace Analysis (ST05) 5. Workprocess Overview (SM50) 6. Operating System Monitor (ST06) 7. Table Call Statistics (ST10) 8. Database Activity (ST04) 9. Profile Maintenance (RZ10) 10. CCMS Monitoring (RZ20) Let&#146;s start with a short description and brief functionality overview one by one:

1. Workload Monitor &#150; ST03/ST03N

image In the picture above you can see the main screen of the workload monitor. In general, the Workload Overview (right panel) is mostly used as a starting point when carrying out the root cause analysis process of a bottleneck in the system. In this part of the tool, the different Task Types are explained in detail, such as the Number of Steps, Avg. Response Time, Avg. CPU Time, Avg. Database Time, Avg. Wait Time and more. The goal here is to try spot a particular task, the overall response time and if the current value for a particular period of time exceeds the allowed threshold (as a rule of thumb, for task type Dialog the Avg. Response Time should stand below 1000ms). Deeper investigation is needed in order to understand where the performance spike is located. Is it located in the database? Is it in the CPU? Is the Network affecting your response times? Sometimes you may also be asking other questions such as: - Is the program performing poorly? - Do we need to add more memory? - Do we need to add more work processes? If so, how many? - Do we need to change a parameter? If so, which one? These are only a few questions that we need to address and the Workload Monitor will help us drive them out!

2. Tune Buffers Monitor &#150; ST02

image A buffer is a memory segment in which the data is temporarily stored. The buffer allows the information to be manipulated by processes more quickly and the main goal is to avoid that data be read from a slow medium like a disk drive. Instead, the information already located in the buffer is accessed much faster. In NetWeaver, there are several different buffers. Each one of them allows a specific type of data to be stored and the objective is to reduce the number of database accesses to a minimum. These buffers are individually placed locally in every Application Server and are implemented as shared memory segments in one or more shared memory pools depending on the operating system. These buffers are: - Program buffer: This buffer stores the compiled executable version of the ABAP programs, also known as program loads. - CUA buffer: This buffer stores menu data, buttons and related SAPGui functionality. - Screen buffer: This buffer stores the screens that are already generated. - Calendar buffer: This buffer stores the factory and user defined holiday calendars. - Generic key table buffer: This buffer stores table entries and can also store the entire table, which is then called full table buffering. - Single record key buffer: This buffer stores only a single entry for a particular table with its corresponding fields. - Export and Import buffer: This buffer is used to store data that needs to be available to several processes using the ABAP sentence EXPORT/IMPORT TO/FROM MEMORY in the ABAP program code. Others are the name table buffers which contain fields and table definitions that are active in the Data Dictionary. The name table is implemented in two different database tables; DDNTT for table definition entries and DDNTF for file description entries. The associated buffers are: - Table definition buffer: Memory segment for table DDNTT. - Field description buffer: Memory segment for table DDNTF. - Short NTAB buffer: This is a summary for Table and Field description buffers. - Initial records buffer: Depending on the field type it stores the layout. With the help of this monitoring tool, you will be able to tune all memory buffer parameters individually. Every single buffer is divided into two parts, the Buffer Size and Buffer Entries. Buffer Size: This is actually the size of the memory segment. By using the correct profile parameter, you will have the option to change this value for every buffer. This is also divided into allocated space and free space. Buffer Entries: The number of buffer entries controls how many objects can be stored in the buffer. You can have sufficient free space but if you run out of directory entries, new objects will not be placed in the buffer and the free space will not be used. The quality of a buffer and how often it is accessed is measured by the %Hit Ratio. This value will indicate if the information stored in the buffers, such as table entries, programs and screens, is being hit directly from the buffer itself or, on the other hand, if the system needs to bring that data from the database since it was not found in the buffer. The %Hit Ratio can have several values. For instance, when you start the system the %Hit Ratio will be below the recommended value until you have some activity in the system and the buffer starts to fill up with data. A good performing buffer will have a %Hit Ratio of 95% and above (99%-100% is excellent). Keep in mind though that a value lower to 95% not always shows that you have a problem. This can lead you to pinpoint and start performing an analysis. However, other factors can also affect buffer quality decreasing %Hit Ratio values. Another important piece is Buffer Swapping. This is a completely different story. When high swapping in a buffer occurs, performance is degraded. Since the information needed by a work process is read from the database and then put into the buffer, the old information that was previously in the buffer needs to be removed (swapped out) allowing the new information to come into it. There are two different factors that will play here, Buffer Size and Buffer Entries (well-known as Directory Entries). If one of them runs out of space, swapping occurs. We also need to keep in mind that some sort of swapping is sometimes normal and doesn&#146;t hurt the system. As a rule of thumb, you don&#146;t need to worry below 1000 swaps in a particular buffer. But also always check the %Free Space and %Free Directory Entries. Good values are up to 85% used space.

3. Statistical Records &#150; STAD

image The statistical records collect information individually for each transaction step such as response times, database times, network times, wait times, front-end times and more, and store that data in a flat file at the operating system level know as the statistical file. This tool will help understand in detail where the performance spike is located by analyzing the transaction activity step by step. Information like how many database records were selected, updated or inserted and in which database tables (if activated), what program name was executed, what screen name and screen number was called and so forth. With the Statistical Records you will be able to understand when the problem is being observed for an averaged, high response time transaction. You will then know how to address that specific performance issue.

4. SQL Trace Analysis - ST05

image My next tool in the top 10 list is the greatest SQL Trace Analysis. This is like magical medicine. Did you ever see thousands of programs indefinitely doing sequential reads in database tables over and over? I&#146;m almost sure the answer is yes! Well, with ST05, those long-running queries hitting the database and selecting millions and millions of useless records are nowadays&#133;an old story. You can trace all the activity for a user and for every program. The output will show the SQL statement, how many records it selects and is bringing from the database, the DECLARE, PREPARE, OPEN, REOPEN, CLOSE and FETCH operations that will be recorded during the trace so that later on when performing the analysis it will be of great help, the execution plans, index advising, sorting of similar statements or duplicated ones, sorting per tables and much more. I will tell you a story&#133; Last month I was working on a project. The functional team with the help of the development team was enhancing some R/3 functionality in a customer system and they were adding more information into the reports that some general manager&#146;s guys used to work with every day. Those guys ran his reports every morning and in less than a minute the rich ALV output was shown on his laptop screen. Up to now, the management people were pretty happy. The development was ready, so one night IT decided to move the enhanced reporting program to production (it had been successfully tested so far in DEV and QA a few days earlier). The next morning I received more than 100 calls from management telling me that those report were taking forever to complete that morning and they asked what had changed. My first thought was, &#147;It&#146;s common, give it some time for the report to be completed, grab some coffee, have a little patience&#148;&#133;but that was only in my thoughts. So, I decided to start working on the issue. I picked up the favorite tool that always came to my mind, SM50 the Work Process Overview (the best of all) and I saw it&#133;90.000 seconds Sequential Read over table BKPF, I hit F5 almost 100 times, and the counter was at 90.001, 90.002, 90.003&#133;90.099, 90.100 and the Sequential Read over BKPF was there anyway. So the next step was to decide to execute my second best tool, ST05 SQL Trace Analysis. I called one of the general managers and I asked to execute the report again (I cancelled the old running report first) and activated SQL Trace for that user ID. The report was running again and when it got stuck reading BKPF sequentially, I let it run once more for another 5 minutes and then I stopped the trace. Now, here&#146;s where the story gets interesting. When I selected to display the contents of the SQL trace file, a popup message asked if I wanted to display more than the 20.000 entries from the trace file, and I thought to myself, &#147;Something is really wrong here. 20.000 entries in less than 5 minutes of trace?&#148; I selected &#147;Yes&#148; and it took about a minute to display the trace list and I saw it&#133;every entry was performing a FETCH over BKPF. I selected one row to display the SQL Statement and then I realized that the actual SQL command was first, selecting every row from BKPF (at that point the BKPF table had more than 45.000.000 rows), not using any valid index and what&#146;s worse was that it was in the WHERE clause. So, I pushed the button to jump directly to the ABAP code where the actual select statement was defined. The ABAP code selecting data from BKPF was changed and the WHERE clause was using sort of an internal table in a loop to get the results. Pretty bad. I called my friend the developer, &#147;Hey, come to my desk. I want to show you something&#148;. He said to me, &#147;Why?&#148; I said, &#147;Your user ID is under the last modification for that ABAP report&#148;. Then he reviewed the report with me and concluded to change the select statement to be now quite more &#147;selective&#148;. After we migrated the change back to production the problem was solved. The report now takes less than 30 seconds to complete. The management guys were happy again. That was the end of the story and all thanks to the SQL Trace.

5. Workprocess Overview - SM50

image And now, let&#146;s discuss the Work Process Overview. I think this is the one top tool every administrator, developer and consultant needs to be familiar with and surely you are already familiar with. If this is not the case, let me introduce it a little bit. SM50 is the main process monitor. From this screen you will be able to see almost everything that is currently running in your NetWeaver system. You can also see detailed information on a particular running process, the developer trace and dispatcher trace and you can change trace level and component to perform a trace on. When you are working in a performance issue or even if you are analyzing something, SM50 will help. I will show you practical examples on the next trip. As a preview, from this screen you can see if the process is doing a Sequential or Direct read over a database table, what user is currently running what report, for how long it is running, etc. In the details screen, you can see information such as how many records were written, read, inserted or deleted, and the current SQL statement or procedure. Well, there is a lot to talk about, but I want to show you how to use this with practical examples, so stay tuned for Trip II.

6. Operating System Monitor - ST06

image Another piece in the list is the OS Monitor. This application is responsible for providing all the operating system values related with CPU utilization, Disk drive information, Network, OS Swapping and others by means of the OSCollector (saposcol) service. With this tool, you can observe if for a particular drive the response time is excessively high or, on the other hand, if disk drives are performing well. I used to work with this tool in order to understand if a performance issue needed to be tackled from a hardware bottleneck perspective. The system is heavily paging? There is a rule of thumb. Paging will not be critical if, for instance, less than a 20%-30% of the main memory is being paged out. You can see the history for memory utilization and draw your own conclusions. If you are analyzing the database server, keep in mind that every request from other application servers will be handled by the database server hardware. In this case, if the system is performing poorly, this will cause poor response time in the whole system. For this reason it is a good practice to have CCMS alerts configured to monitor CPU utilization, Disk response times, and Memory paging. With the help of these three monitoring objects, you can have a real-time picture of what is going on at the hardware level in the system. The Disk monitor is also an important part of the OS Monitor. From the Disk monitor you can check every Disk or Logical Drive response times. This is particularly important in the database server since every database operation will impact on those response times. As a rule, if you have more than 50%-60% Disk drive utilization, start with a more in-depth analysis since overall system performance will be affected because of these slow drives.

7. Table Call Statistics - ST10

image With this Table Call Statistics transaction, you will be able to see detailed information regarding the table and the table buffer status. In NetWeaver, there are several different buffers. In this application will work directly with the Table Buffers. As you should already know, when a table is buffered its contents are located in a memory segment in the shared memory pool locally under the application server and that table information is read much faster from the buffer. The overall goal is to reduce database accesses and disk times as much as possible. Read operation over a buffered table is around 80 times faster than accessing the table directly from the database. Do you remember we had already been talking about buffers before in this blog? Well, the tables that have buffering enabled are store in the Generic Key Table buffer and in the Single Record Key Table buffer. In the standard delivery of every NetWeaver component there are several tables that are already buffering enabled, but for a particular table, You can also define the buffer settings and whether or not you want to allow buffering. There is also a rule of thumb. You should enable buffering for a particular table if that table has more read operations than write operations. Otherwise, the table buffer will be invalidated because the write operation and the %Buffer Hit Ratio will be below the recommended value since the system needs to flush the buffer contents to the disk after the insert, delete or update operation and then it will need to populate the buffer again. From a performance perspective this is not quite feasible.

8. Database Activity - ST04

image The Database Monitor shows specific information related to the current performance in the database interface. Almost everything going on in the database will be presented here. Data buffer allocation, Hit Ratio, DB Connections, CPU Times, Index utilization, Database files status and utilization and more. This tool is another key piece in the performance world. When analyzing database accesses, a good approach is to take a closer look at this transaction. Detailed table analysis can be performed through this. For a particular table, you can see the fragmentation level and if that table needs reorganization.

9. Profile Maintenance - RZ10

image From the Profile Management screen we will be able to change the system parameters. In our current case, we will change the related performance and I will show you how to do so with specific recommendations. The following is a list of the most common parameters we will work with during our journey: Program buffer abap/buffersize CUA buffer rsdb/cua/buffersize Screen buffer zcsa/presentation_buffer_area sap/bufdir_entries Generic key table buffer zcsa/table_buffer_area zcsa/db_max_buftab Single record table buffer rtbb/buffer_length rtbb/max_tables Export/import buffer rsdb/obj/buffersize rsdb/obj/max_objects rsdb/obj/large_object_size OTR buffer rsdb/otr/buffersize_kb rsdb/otr/max_objects Exp/Imp SHM buffer rsdb/esm/buffersize_kb rsdb/esm/max_objects rsdb/esm/large_object_size Table definition buffer rsdb/ntab/entrycount Field description buffer rsdb/ntab/ftabsize rsdb/ntab/entrycount Initial record buffer rsdb/ntab/irbdsize rsdb/ntab/entrycount Short nametab (NTAB) rsdb/ntab/sntabsize rsdb/ntab/entrycount Calendar buffer zcsa/calendar_area zcsa/calendar_ids Roll, extended and heap memory ztta/roll_area ztta/roll_first rdisp/ROLL_SHM rdisp/PG_SHM rdisp/PG_LOCAL em/initial_size_MB em/blocksize_KB em/address_space_MB ztta/roll_extension abap/heap_area_dia abap/heap_area_nondia abap/heap_area_total abap/heaplimit Workprocess Distribution rdisp/wp_no_dia rdisp/wp_no_btc rdisp/wp_no_vb rdisp/wp_no_vb2

10. CCMS Monitoring - RZ20

image The CCMS Monitors will enable us to understand what is going on almost in real-time in a system for a monitored object. There are, as you can see in the picture above, several factory defined monitors that you can use. The monitor set All Contents on Local Application Server is a good one since when you activate it (double click on it) it will show you the entire monitoring context within the local application server. You also have the possibility to assign Auto-Reactions methods and own analysis methods to every monitored object. Later I will show you how to do that and what the best objects to monitor are. In the meantime, you can give it a try for yourself. Go to RZ20 and play with it! As a brief description, to configure the CCMS agents and Email alerts to be sent from a Central System (CEN) it&#146;s necessary to complete the following tasks: Configure SMTP in the Central system (CEN) by enabling the built-in SMTP plug-in (as of BASIS release 6.x). This step will not be part of this blog. Please refer to OSS Note 455140 for installation instructions and additional information. You will need to install the CCMS agents in each monitored system to enable the alerts and emails. This is necessary because CEN alerts are handled by the remote CCMS agents locally in every satellite system. You should then configure the alerts in the CEN system by enabling the emails selecting the correct monitoring object and configuring email destinations properly. Don&#146;t worry! We will do this step by step in the upcoming trips. :-D

- Conclusions so far&#133;

We are at the end of our current trip. During this first journey I have shown you the Top 10 tools you will became familiar with throughout our trips. I will introduce the key parts of every one of them and tell you when you need to chose what. In the next trip, we will take each one, one by one, and with practical and real examples, we will learn which of them has helped optimize response times in one particular area. See you in the next upcoming trip. Stay tuned!

More blogs on SDN

System Monitoring configuration guide for Dummies

Service Desk configuration guide for dummies.

SDCC - Service Data Control Center configuration guide for Dummies.

CCMS Rule Based Monitors configuration guide for Dummies

<body>http://www.sdn.sap.com/irj/servlet/prt/portal/prtroot/docs/webcontent/uuid/925b02f9-0b01-0010-bbbf-c68268bb3c41|border=0! http://www.sdn.sap.com/irj/servlet/prt/portal/prtroot/docs/webcontent/uuid/7ec202f9-0b01-0010-589e-a51bcd596fed|border=0!

 

First of all, you will need to perform some preparation steps, follow these instructions below:

Check level of Basis and ABAP Support Packs in the Satellite Systems. For example: for release 4.6C, Support Package 51 (or Support Package 50 with Notes 832585 and 838537) is required. For WAS 620 Support Package 54 is then required.

 

Let’s now start with the required configuration steps to setup Service Desk in SAP Solution Manager 3.2.

 

1. Activate Solution Manager Services:

 

 

a.

Go to transaction

SICF

. Navigate the tree below to each of the services listed. If the service is currently grayed out you will need to activate it. For example, navigate to /sap/public/bsp/sap/htmlb

 

image

 

b.

If the service is grayed out, as in the example, you need to activate it, for this, select the service, go to Service/VirtualHost Menu and then select

Activate

. In the following screen, select the

Y

button, to activate the service and all the dependent services.

 

image

 

Now, the BSP service is activated, see below:

 

image

 

c.

The same procedure needs to be performed also for the following services:

 

     /sap/public/bsp/sap/htmlb

     /sap/bc/bsp/sap/ai_proj_setup

     /sap/bc/bsp/sap/dswpnotifcreate

     /sap/bc/bsp/sap/dswp_create_message

     /sap/bc/bsp/sap/dswp_bsp

     /sap/bc/bsp/sap/learning_map

     /sap/bc/bsp/sap/public/bc

     /sap/bc/bsp/sap/solutionmanager

     /sap/bc/bsp/sap/system

     /sap/bc/contentserver

     /sap/bc/solman

 

2. Activating Solution Manager BC-Sets required for Service Desk:

 

 

a.

Go to transaction

SCPR20

. The following screen will be shown:

 

image

 

b.

In the BC set enter the BC set that needs to be activated, for example:

SERVICE_DESK_CHANGE_REQUEST_32A

 

image

 

c.

Press the activate (!https://weblogs.sdn.sap.com/weblogs/images/26943/BCSets_Activate.JPG|height=20|alt=image|width=24|src=https://weblogs.sdn.sap.com/weblogs/images/26943/BCSets_Activate.JPG|border=0!) button. The following screen will be shown:

 

image

 

d.

Make sure to select Expertmode and Overwrite All Dataoptions, and then, click on the continue button (!https://weblogs.sdn.sap.com/weblogs/images/26943/BCSets_OK.JPG|height=22|alt=image|width=23|src=https://weblogs.sdn.sap.com/weblogs/images/26943/BCSets_OK.JPG|border=0!). The BC set will be now activated.

e.

Now repeat steps

a

through

d

to activate also the following BC Sets:

 

     SERVICE_DESK_CHANGE_REQUEST_32A

     SERVICE_DESK_CHANGE_REQUEST_32F2

     SERVICE_DESK_CHANGE_REQUEST_32A7

     SERVICE_DESK_CHANGE_REQUEST_32A8

     SERVICE_DESK_CHANGE_REQUEST_32A9

     SVDSK_CORPFUNC_SECURE_AREA_32_01

 

3. Fetching SAP components:

 

 

This will transfer the standard SAP components from SAPNet R/3 Frontend into the Solution Manager system. Go to transaction

DSWP

then select

Edit/Fetch SAP Components

from the menu.

 

4. Assign the number ranges for ABA notifications:

 

 

a.

Go to transaction

DNO_CUST01

and select notification type

SLF1

, see screen below:

 

image

 

b.

Select in the menu

Goto -> Details

 

image

 

c.

Assign internal number range

01

in the in the Number Range field. Then press the save (!https://weblogs.sdn.sap.com/weblogs/images/26943/ABA_Save.JPG|height=18|alt=image|width=22|src=https://weblogs.sdn.sap.com/weblogs/images/26943/ABA_Save.JPG|border=0!) button, see screen below:

 

image

 

5. Assign number range for Service Desk Messages:

 

 

a.

Go to transaction

SPRO

Open the tree and navigate to SAP Solution Manager Implementation Guide --> SAP Solution Manager --> Basic Settings --> SAP Solution Manager System --> Service Desk --> Number Ranges for Notifications. Then press the execute icon (!https://weblogs.sdn.sap.com/weblogs/images/26943/ABA_Execute.JPG|height=25|alt=image|width=26|src=https://weblogs.sdn.sap.com/weblogs/images/26943/ABA_Execute.JPG|border=0!) next to

Assign number range for Service Desk Messages

.

 

image

 

b.

Select transaction type

SLFN

from the Definition of Transaction types window, see screen below for details:

 

image

 

image

 

c.

Choose

Goto -> Details

from the menu:

 

image

 

d.

Assign the internal number range

01

and the external number range

02

under Transaction / Activity Numbering:

 

image

 

e.

Now press the (!https://weblogs.sdn.sap.com/weblogs/images/26943/ABA_Save.JPG|height=18|alt=image|width=22|src=https://weblogs.sdn.sap.com/weblogs/images/26943/ABA_Save.JPG|border=0!)button.

 

6. Configuring the ABA Messages:

 

 

a.

Go to transaction

DNO_CUST01

then select notification type

SLF1

.

 

image

 

b.

Choose

Goto -> Details

from the menu:

 

image

 

c.

Check whether action profile

SLFN0001_STANDARD_DNO

is assigned, if not assign it, see below:

 

image

 

d.

Now press the (!https://weblogs.sdn.sap.com/weblogs/images/26943/ABA_Save.JPG|height=18|alt=image|width=22|src=https://weblogs.sdn.sap.com/weblogs/images/26943/ABA_Save.JPG|border=0!)button.

e.

Go to transaction

DNO_CUST04

. Select the field

NO_USER_CHECK

, see details below:

 

image

 

f.

Choose

Goto -> Details

from the menu:

 

image

 

g.

Enter

X

in Field Value.

 

image

 

h.

Now press the (!https://weblogs.sdn.sap.com/weblogs/images/26943/ABA_Save.JPG|height=18|alt=image|width=22|src=https://weblogs.sdn.sap.com/weblogs/images/26943/ABA_Save.JPG|border=0!)button.

 

7. Generate Business Partners:

 

 

 

 

See details in the screen below:

 

image

 

8. Create Message Processors:

 

 

a.

Go to transaction

BP

(Business Partner). From the menu, choose <b>Business Partner -> Create -> Person</b> or edit an existing Business Partner of type person.

 

image

 

b.

Choose the role

Employee

.

 

image

 

c.

Choose the

Address

tab and enter the address data for the message processor, see details below:

 

image

 

d.

Choose the

Identification

tab and go to the

Employee

data section:

 

image

 

e.

Enter the user ID of the message processor in the User field. The message processor has to have a user in the SAP Solution Manager system.

f.

Click the save icon (!https://weblogs.sdn.sap.com/weblogs/images/26943/ABA_Save.JPG|height=18|alt=image|width=22|src=https://weblogs.sdn.sap.com/weblogs/images/26943/ABA_Save.JPG|border=0!).If an error message is displayed from the program

CRM_MKTBP_ZCAL_UPDATE_30

, see SAP Note 450640.

g.

To create additional users, repeat the steps from

a

through

f

.

 

9. Create Organization Business Partners:

 

 

a.

In transaction

Maintain Business Partners

(transaction BP), choose Business Partner -> Create -> Organization</b>:

 

image

 

b.

Choose the role

Sold-to Party

.

 

image

 

c.

Choose the

Address

tab and enter the address data for the sold-to party, see below:

 

image

 

d.

Choose the

Sales Area Data

button.

 

image

 

e.

Choose the

Choose Sales Area...

button.

 

image

 

f.

Select

Sales Organization – Sales

 

image

 

g.

In the Sales tab, select

Sol_Customergroup

from the input help in field

Customer Group 1

.

 

image

 

h.

Click the save icon (!https://weblogs.sdn.sap.com/weblogs/images/26943/ABA_Save.JPG|height=18|alt=image|width=22|src=https://weblogs.sdn.sap.com/weblogs/images/26943/ABA_Save.JPG|border=0!).

i.

Repeat the steps to create additional sold-to parties.

 

10. Define Service Desk destinations in the Solution Manager System:

 

 

a.

Go to transaction

SPRO

. Open the tree and navigate to <b>SAP Solution Manager Implementation Guide -> SAP Solution Manager -> Basic Settings -> SAP Solution Manager System -> Service Desk</b>. Press the execute icon (!https://weblogs.sdn.sap.com/weblogs/images/26943/ABA_Execute.JPG|height=25|alt=image|width=26|src=https://weblogs.sdn.sap.com/weblogs/images/26943/ABA_Execute.JPG|border=0!) next to Define Service Desk Destination in the Solution Manager System.

 

image

 

b.

In view

Create Messages: Customizing

, check whether application

OSS_MSG

exists. If it exists, go to the following step, if not, continue to

c.

to create it.

c.

Press the modify button and then the

New Entries

Button next to it.

 

image

 

d.

Make the following settings for the application

OSS_MSG

:

Column 1: Application: OSS_MSG
Column 2: + : W
Column 3: RFC Destination: NONE
Column 4: + : CUST620
Column 5: + : 1.0

e.

Click the save icon (!https://weblogs.sdn.sap.com/weblogs/images/26943/ABA_Save.JPG|height=18|alt=image|width=22|src=https://weblogs.sdn.sap.com/weblogs/images/26943/ABA_Save.JPG|border=0!).

 

11. Schedule the background jobs in Solution Manager:

 

 

a.

Go to transaction

SM36

. For Job name enter

SOLMAN_ISSUE_STATUS_REFRESH

, Job class

C

, then press the Step (!https://weblogs.sdn.sap.com/weblogs/images/26943/ABA_Step.JPG|height=23|alt=image|width=65|src=https://weblogs.sdn.sap.com/weblogs/images/26943/ABA_Step.JPG|border=0!) button.

 

image

 

b.

  Enter the information as in the screen below, and press the save icon (!https://weblogs.sdn.sap.com/weblogs/images/26943/ABA_Save.JPG|height=18|alt=image|width=22|src=https://weblogs.sdn.sap.com/weblogs/images/26943/ABA_Save.JPG|border=0!).

 

image

 

12. Define Service Desk destination in the Satellite systems:

 

 

Note:

for this you need to log in the satellite system.

a.

Go to transaction

SM30

.

b.

In table/view field, enter BCOS_CUST. Then press the

Maintain Button

. See example below:

 

image

 

c.

Press the

Continue

button in the following screen:

 

image

 

d.

You should see the following screen, no entries should be seen in the table. Press the

New Entries

button:

 

image

 

e.

In the next screen, enter the following information:

!https://weblogs.sdn.sap.com/weblogs/images/26943/ABA_33.JPG|height=220|alt=image|width=538|src=https://weblogs.sdn.sap.com/weblogs/images/26943/ABA_33.JPG|border=0!

http://www.sdn.sap.com/irj/servlet/prt/portal/prtroot/docs/webcontent/uuid/925b02f9-0b01-0010-bbbf-c68268bb3c41" width="235"/> http://www.sdn.sap.com/irj/servlet/prt/portal/prtroot/docs/webcontent/uuid/7ec202f9-0b01-0010-589e-a51bcd596fed" width="235"/> This solution allows customers to centralize the implementation, operation, monitoring, support and maintenance of all NetWeaver components. SAP® Solution Manager has positive technical as well as business impacts, because it improves the interconnection between processes and the underlying IT infrastructure in a centralized or decentralized environment. The result is concrete: easy and effective communications between the IT department and the business units of your organization; crucial for the success of your company business.

Brief description of characteristics and opportunities:

Solutions Monitoring: It allows real time monitoring of systems, business processes, interfaces and even system interdependencies, reducing the administration efforts. Proactive monitoring helps you prevent critical situations, while automatic notifications allow you to respond rapidly. NetWeaver Implementations: Using Solution Manager in the configuration of information and process orientation, configuration and final preparation will accelerate the system implementations. Solution Manager allows the efficient administration of projects and centralized control of cross-components. Synchronization of customized preferences: Solution Manager will allow you to keep a consistent IT environment. This solution favors the administration of the parameters you are willing to customize. Therefore, the expense of unnecessary inconsistency test and even the risk of making mistakes are not faced. Solution Manager reduces the manual synchronization efforts automatically distributing its preferences to multiple systems, in a simultaneous and centralized fashion. Testing: It provides a single access point to the system and it allows centralized storage of materials and results of each test, which will be useful as support of other test processes in the future. IT and applications support: The Support Desk included in Solution Manager helps you handle incidents more efficiently, and it also favors the support cost estimation. The support messages centralized administration makes all the organization much more efficient. Global Development: The homogenous methodology and functionality of this tool helps the standardization and harmonization of processes in global companies or with multiple sites or branches. Thus, the implementation in each site will be simple because the total configuration of facilities in each one will not be necessary. Service Level Reporting and Management: This solution favors the simple definition of service levels and provides automatic reports. The information regarding the service level comprehends all the solution systems and provides a consolidated report that contains all the information that you need to make strategic decisions in the IT environment of your company. Service Recommendations: Solution Manager puts forward adequate recommendations about additional support services needed to obtain the highest performance of your IT operations.

Here are five key benefits:

  • Trustworthy IT solutions:
  • Minimizing the risk during configuration and operation.
  • Implementation and improvement cost reduction:
  • The tools that make up this solution make your projects more efficient.
  • Fast ROI:
  • Accelerating the implementation and continuous IT infrastructure, improving the business.
  • Lower operating costs:
  • Through a unique administration point for multiple component environments.
  • More from your investments:
  • As it is an open solution it integrates to environments of applications SAP® and non SAP®. The above shown descriptions indicate basically how Solution Manager can help you (in your work). Nowadays, several companies make the following questions before implementing this powerful tool: 1. Why should I need to implement Solution Manager in my landscape? 2. Can I wait until next release upgrade of the R3 system, ie: ECC 500? 3. Should I wait for the next Solution Manager release version or can I implement the current version? 4. Will this tool increase my administrative efforts since I need to maintain an additional SAP instance? 5. Is there any additional fee associated with Solution Manager? These are the 5 top questions that currently every customer asks me when they come to evaluate the possibility of implementing a Solution Manager in their SAP landscape or they ask me if they should wait. The answer to these questions is that you will be benefited as soon as you implement a Solution Manager without having to wait for the next Solution Manager release or your next R3 release upgrade. Moreover, in order to avoid unnecessary delays with the implementation or upgrade of your current NetWeaver components, I suggest starting the Solution Manager implementation planning beforehand. Take enough time to learn the key functionalities of this tool, and then put them into practice to enhance your new project. Solution Manager is included into your maintenance contract so there will be nothing that can stop you from immediately implementing a Solution Manager. Those companies that have already implemented a Solution Manager understand that it is unnecessary to have a resource completely assigned to the administration of Solution Manager itself; it is just a matter of having the proper hardware sizing and a correct installation; then we can assure Solution Manager is self-administered. Those smart customers who have been using Solution Manager for many years are happy to know that for the next release upgrade and/or implementation, Solution Manager will be a key part of the project; and not only from the implementation point of view, but also from business processing, change management, monitoring and alerting perspective.

Related Solution Manager configuration guides on SDN

System Monitoring configuration guide for Dummies

Service Desk configuration guide for dummies.

SDCC - Service Data Control Center configuration guide for Dummies.

CCMS Rule Based Monitors configuration guide for Dummies

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